A rose by any other name is still a warmonger.

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Quotes: Protecting the emaciated.

imageTo put it otherwise and more simply: a shepherd is no mere warder-off of wild beasts. To save the sheep from wild beasts and all other dangers is not to feed them; and if they are not fed, what matters whether they are safe or not? What is the good of being saved to starve?

-William Still

Three more 5-star reviews for The Visitor.

Here are the highlights from this week’s featured reader reviews of The Visitor:

1). “Had me hooked from the start . . . . The ending was spectacular.”

2). “An excellent short story that captures your imagination . . . . Well done.”

3). “This is a great story that makes you think . . . . I can’t wait for the next story.”


Download The Visitor today.

The worst ways to begin your novel.

imageThe Write Life blog has featured some handy tips on how not to begin your novel, from an article entitled: The Worst Ways to Begin Your Novel.

No one reads more prospective novel beginnings than literary agents.

They’re the ones on the front lines, sifting through inboxes and slush piles. And they can tell us which Chapter One approaches are overused and cliché, as well as which writing techniques just plain don’t work when you’re writing a book.

Below, find a smattering of feedback from experienced literary agents on what they hate to see in the first pages of a writer’s submission. Consider it a guide on how to start a novel. Avoid these problems and tighten your submission!

Continue reading here.

Family devotions.

img_0326I discovered an absolutely perfect article for those struggling with leading devotions with their family. I trust that Donald S. Whitney’s, Family Worship and the Day I Made My Daughter Cry, will be a great encouragement to you as it was for me. 

Thank You So Much, Dad

My daughter, Laurelen, graduated from a small, classical Christian high school. The school enjoys a commencement tradition in which the parents hand the diploma to their child, but only after speaking a few words of encouragement (usually accompanied with some nostalgia) to him or her. The graduate responds with some brief, prepared remarks of his or her own.

From her response to us, here’s the section Laurelen specifically addressed to me:

Read the rest of the article here at Crossway