News and Commentary

25 Facts About Lee Harvey Oswald You Were Never Told About.

October 18, 2018, would have been Lee Harvey Oswald’s 79th birthday. To mark the occasion, here are 25 facts you were never told about this mysterious man.

FAMILY TIES

1). Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, Lee Harvey Oswald was the fifth cousin (five times removed) of Confederate General, Robert E. Lee. In Fact, Lee Harvey Oswald’s father’s name was Robert E. Lee Oswald Senior.

THE EARLY YEARS

2). As a teenager, Lee Harvey Oswald was a fan of the TV show, I Led Three Lives. The show ran from 1953 to 1956 and is described as, “An advertising executive poses as a Communist agent but secretly reports to the FBI.”

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Lee Oswald

3). Enlisting with the Marines in 1956, Oswald eventually obtained top secret security clearance and was stationed at the American U2 radar base in Atsugi, Japan where he monitored radar for American spy planes.

TO RUSSIA AND BACK

4). Oswald defected to Russia — America’s Cold War enemy at the time — in October of 1959 where he renounced his American citizenship.

(Those who believe Oswald killed President John F. Kennedy point to this defection as proof that Oswald was a communist, whereas those critical of the official story about Oswald’s involvement in the assassination point to this as one of Oswald’s covers as a U.S. intelligence agent in order to appear as a communist sympathizer. In the intelligence community this is commonly referred to as “sheep dipping.”)

5). Almost two years after defecting, Oswald typed a letter to the American Embassy on August 08, 1961, about returning to America. Strangely, he wrote in that letter, “I believe I could catch a military hop back to the States, from Berlin.”

Catching a ride on an American military plane would be an outlandish suggestion from someone that defected to America’s Cold War enemy and renounced his American citizenship, but not as outlandish as America’s response: the U.S. State Department actually loaned Oswald (a supposed enemy defector) $435.71 so he could fly back to America.

6). Oswald was (miraculously) not arrested upon his return and his new Russian wife, Marina, was also allowed into the country without reservation.

FRIENDS IN HIGH PLACES

George de Mohrenschildt
George de Mohrenschildt

7). Oswald continued to present himself as a Marxist, while simultaneously becoming friends with avowed anti-communists such as Guy Banister (former FBI), David Ferrie (Civil Air Patrol and involved in CIA military training for anti-Castro exiles), and Clay Shaw (businessman and CIA informant).

8). Another one of Oswald’s anti-communist friends was European émigré, George de Mohrenschildt, a petroleum geologist who just happened to also be friends with CIA employee, George H.W. Bush. Yes, the same George H.W. Bush who would later become CIA director and the 41st president of the United States (and who claimed he couldn’t remember where he was the day JFK was assassinated).

Continue reading here.

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News and Commentary

What ever happened to the bygone days of pipe smoking?

Ever wonder why you don’t see as many pipe smokers today as we once saw years ago?

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Well, Marcus Jones offers his take on this in his article entitled “Why Don’t People Smoke Pipes Anymore?

Here’s an excerpt from that article:

“When a bunch of guys have big, fat cigars in their mouths, they will inevitably start talking about women and sports, whereas a group of pipe smokers might become engrossed in the topic of the economy in Zimbabwe or the declining quality of tweed elbow patches, which would make for what most would find a very boring evening.”

I think Marcus Jones is onto something here.

There’s a certain debonair sophistication about pipe smoking. But as sophistication has gone the way of the Dodo bird (along with a list of apparently other archaic concepts such as critical thought, shared morality, common decency, and basic civility), so has gone the fine art of pipe smoking.

And fedoras. Let’s not forget fedoras.

Personally, if I smoked tobacco, I’d feel more at home with the pipe smokers and their “boring” conversations, even though I don’t know much about tweed.

So let’s bring it back, shall we? Let’s bring back the lost allure of deep, cognitive conversations punctuated with puffs from a pipe while wearing fedoras. Oh, and with a side of tea or coffee.

Who’s with me?

(Read Marcus Jones’ entire article here.)

News and Commentary

America’s non-readers.

This article contains some very interesting facts regarding the demographics of non-readers in America.

Most surprising is that 28% of those over age 50 haven’t read a book in the past year, compared to only 20% spanning the ages 18 to 49. But then again, if you’ve ever been to a nursing home then you know that the TVs are all on and the bookshelves are usually covered in a layer of undisturbed dust. Beside eyesight being an issue in the elderly, I don’t have an answer for why over a quarter of older Americans don’t read.

Overall, this article is worth the short read . . . unless, of course, you’re a non-reader.

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/03/23/who-doesnt-read-books-in-america/