Reviews, Story: Alibi Interrupted

Review of “Alibi Interrupted” by book blogger, Olivia Emily.

I’m honored to have been given a 5-star rating by book blogger Olivia Emily for my ebook, Alibi Interrupted. Here’s an excerpt from her review:

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“I rarely read novels of this genre – speculative fiction – but returning to Pattison’s writing is like returning to an old friend. It makes me want to read more [books] like this. Honestly, Pattison’s books are the kind that really remind you why you love reading. I mentioned this in my review of The Martian by Andy Weir: sometimes, I’ll just stumble upon a book, and throughout reading, I know I’m reading greatness.”

To read Olivia’s full review of Alibi Interrupted, check out her featured blog post here.

To download your copy of Alibi Interrupted, visit JLPattison.com here or Amazon here.

imageIf you prefer paperback, Alibi Interrupted is featured in the two-story collection Saving Kennedy which can be ordered at JLPattison.com here or from Amazon.

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Reviews

“Brilliant and Amazing.”

This week’s featured reader review of The Visitor comes from Amazon:

imageDownload your copy here, and see why this reviewer called The Visitor, “Brilliant and amazing.”

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Reviews, Story: The Visitor

“The Visitor is a great story with intrigue and pacing that makes you not want to put it down.”

imageThis week’s featured reader review comes from an Amazon customer named Keller. Here’s what he had to say about my debut short story, The Visitor:

I’m typically not a fan of short fiction, however, I loved The Visitor by J.L. Pattison. My only complaint is that it wasn’t longer! The Visitor is a great story with intrigue and pacing that makes you not want to put it down.

Download your copy today and see why Keller called The VisitorA great short story.”

Reviews, Story: The Visitor

“There is an allusion to the tension between the sovereignty of God and the outworking of history in relation to time travel. I find that to be an interesting thought experiment.” 

imageThis week’s featured reader review of The Visitor comes from Heath Cross (who blogs at Tides and Turnings). Heath left his review of The Visitor on Amazon and I’ve reprinted below.

The book itself is a short story set in the late 1800s through the mid 1900s. It blends science fiction with real history. I’m not always a fan of such, but he actually pulls it off quite well. It tells the story of how an American from some point in ‘the future’ attempts to travel back to warn the founding fathers of the United States of the future actions of the nation and the tragedies it will be involved in. The time traveler doesn’t quite make his destination of late 18th Century America, but he does manage to give his account to a former slave, now farmer, in late 19th Century Georgia. Leroy Jenkins, our Georgia farmer, has a hard time getting anyone, including a fairly well known journalist, to believe his story about the future of America. But by the end of the story, the assassination of a president makes at least one believer out of the long-dead Leroy’s story.

Pattison manages to weave some interesting themes and allusions into the story. I personally enjoyed this aspect of the narrative, though he is kind of scratching where I itch on these. There is an allusion to the tension between the sovereignty of God and the outworking of history in relation to time travel. I find that to be an interesting thought experiment. Finally, there’s a big nod given to Neil Postman and his vision of the American future given in Amusing Ourselves to Death; Pattison even manages to give a bit of a nod to Aldous Huxley, though I know he’s not a huge fan of Brave New World. The needle-in-the-arm-sedation ending is quite Huxlean, and I thought it was a brilliant ending.

I recommend the story. It’s a very short read, but quite intriguing. The weaving of an interesting fictional narrative with theology, history, political commentary, media ecology, science fiction, and pharmaceuticals in such a short space is impressive.

Download your copy of The Visitor here, and see why Heath called it, “A weaving of many strands into a very good story.

Reviews, Story: The Visitor

“J.L.’s ability to capture an entire sci-fi / mystery / time-travel thriller in less than 7,000 words is nothing short of amazing.”

imageThis week’s featured review of The Visitor comes from Mark Escalera who left the following review on Amazon.com: 

A 7,000 word wild ride.

Buckle up! From the opening paragraph to the final moment, the realization that this is not going to be an ordinary read hits you with J.L.’s flair for the dramatic. While it is not overly dramatic, the plot is driven home and I guarantee you will be old before you forget this book. I am an avid reader and a writer myself, but I have learned much from the reading of this little novel. Sometimes the multitude of words is not the way to win readers and J.L.’s ability to capture an entire sci-fi / mystery / time-travel thriller in less than 7,000 words is nothing short of amazing.

Great job, J.L., if this is only your first book, I cannot wait to see what else your pen and typewriter are able to produce in the years ahead. May all your dreams come true and success for the journey with each page you write.

You can check out Mark Escalera’s writing blog here (where he brings stories to life), and download your copy of The Visitor here

Reviews

My first “total stranger” review of The Visitor.

I was recently blessed to stumble upon Olivia Woodcock, a book reviewer from the United Kingdom, and asked if she would be willing to review my short story, The Visitor. Not only did she oblige, but she left me a glowing review on Amazon.com in America, on Amazon.com in her native country, on GoodReads, and on her own personal blog.

I am grateful for her review and her willingness to support indie authors. You can read Olivia’s complete review on her blog BiblioMad, where she’s “completely mad about books.”

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